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DÜSSELDORF | 2nd – 3rd February, 2017

EXPERIENCE INDUSTRY 4.0

Agenda Overview


See all Session Descriptions

Day 1 - Thursday - 2 February, 2017

Session descriptions day 1

8.00 am

Registration

9.00 am
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal B

Welcome and Opening with Conference Chair Dr. Eric Klemp

Dr. Eric Klemp, COO, voestalpine Additive Manufacturing Center GmbH

9.10 am
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal B

Morning Keynote:

Insights In The History And Drivers Of The AM Markets

3D-Printing or Additive Manufacturing have been going through nearly 30 years of evolution. More and more they are recognized as a disruptive revolution in manufacturing that is the frontline of concepts such as the Internet of Things or Industry 4.0. These are all nice buzz-words, but what are the practical consequences in the wide variety of markets that are or will be served. What has happened already and what can be expected as a consequence? How to prepare for the AM future, that is called today?
Moderator:

Dr. Eric Klemp, COO, voestalpine Additive Manufacturing Center GmbH

Speaker:

Fried Vancraen, CEO, Materialise

10.05 am
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal B

Sponsored Sessions:

ACEO® - Pioneering 3D Printing with Silicones

ACEO® is revolutionizing the world of additive manufacturing by introducing the world’s first real elastomer which can be 3D printed. Proven silicone experts from WACKER developed not only the material, but also software and hardware opening up new opportunities for various industries such as health care, automotive, electronics or even life style goods only to name a few. Protoypes, individualized products, novel designs or “impossible products” (which could not have been produced with any other technology before) can now be manufactured from silicone. The technology is based on a “drop-on-demand” principle. The print head deposits single silicone voxels on a building platform, which flow together smoothly, forming a homogenous surface. After printing a layer, the curing is activated with UV light. For complex 3D structures a support material is printed throughout the same process. At the end of the printing process, the silicone form is removed from the printer and the environmentally safe support material is easily and quickly rinsed out with water.
Speaker:

Katharina Berres, Head of Marketing & Communications, ACEO® - 3D Printing with Silicones

10.15 am

Coffee Break

10.50 am
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal B

Technologies:

HP: Multi Jet Fusion

The presentation is about the Multijet Fusion methodology and the processes applied for additive manufacturing. How does it work, what’s the solution looking like and first results from day to day work. It also covers HP’s open platform and materials and the potential arising from it as well as a glance at the software.
Moderator:

Dr. Eric Klemp, COO, voestalpine Additive Manufacturing Center GmbH

Speaker:

Christoph Lindner, Enterprise Sales Manager 3D printing, HP Deutschland GmbH

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal C

Applied Design:

Selective Laser Melting In Heat Exchanger Development

Thermal management has become more important in recent years due to its potential to save energy. A way of achieving is to improve cooler efficiency.

Mahle Industrial Thermal Systems Gmbh as manufacturer of heat exchangers for non-automotive vehicles uses the benefits of Selective Laser Melting (SLM) in order to produce sophisticated heat exchangers.

SLM as additive manufacturing technique gives rise to implementing it for heat exchanger design due its degrees of freedom in design and high dimensional accuracy.

Moreover, the benefits of SLM can be applied for turbulator development as it is independent of conventional tooling. Experimental thermal hydraulic tests can be conducted much faster as a result of the rapid prototyping approach.

Moderator:

Dr. Guido Adam, CEO, DMRC - Direct Manufacturing Research Center

Speaker:

Jonas Kühndel, PhD Student, MAHLE Industrial Thermal Systems GmbH & Co. KG

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Platon 2

Digitisation:

Industry 4.0: More Data, More Difficult Decisions? How A Decision Support Can Help Applying Additive Manufacturing

A connected company environment makes much more data available than before. This provides a better basis for decisions but makes them at the same time more difficult to conduct as the decision making process becomes more complex and unclear. In addition to that the problem is that the experience with AM is still very low in most companies and a transferability from conventional technologies to AM is difficult. A decision support is required that determines the further procedure at certain crosspoints. With the help of such software tools a continuous digital process chain can be realized especially with the help of Additive Manufacturing as a digital manufacturing technology which together accommodate the Industry 4.0 approach. The presentation will rely on a use case from the aerospace industry as an example for time critical production and repair.
Moderator:

Christian-Friedrich Lindemann, Research Exploitation Manager, DMRC - Direct Manufacturing Research Center

Speaker:

Gereon Deppe, Research Assistant, Paderborn University – DMRC

11.20 am

Session Change

11.25 am
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal B

Technologies:

The Missing Link In Industrial Additive Manufacturing

The current developments in industrial (metal) additive manufacturing show a clear tendency towards production facilities focused on series production of (metal) parts in demanding high-tech industries. One of the key elements in developing these kinds of manufacturing solutions is the further integration of equipment and software – currently a missing link in the AM space. In order to support dynamic (offsite) planning and scheduling, equipment and environment monitoring, build simulation and quality control, a new level of software solutions is required that do not only support the entire AM workflow, but also integrate with 3rd party tools for specialized functions or applications. In order to improve reproducibility and predictability, having a single environment where all relevant data is stored allows for more effective learning and process optimization. On top of that, managing process and data in a single controlled environment will support certification processes and reduce chances of error. This session will focus on the developments in the industry and software markets and how these will integrate into the manufacturing solutions of the future.
Moderator:

Dr. Eric Klemp, COO, voestalpine Additive Manufacturing Center GmbH

Speaker:

Ilko Bosman, Manager Finance & IT, Additive Industries b.v.

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal C

Applied Design:

Feasibility Study 3D Printing Of Electric Motors

Additive Manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D printing, is a relatively new technology which enables the toolless production of components and entire assemblies directly from a CAD file. Today, the technology is still not widely used in industrial production. It is mainly limited to special applications, although it shows great potential. In this presentation, first approaches are shown to apply AM to the production of rotors for permanent magnet synchronous machines (PMSM). The possibilities of a lightweight design with a low moment of inertia as well as the influence on the magnetic anisotropy for an improved sensorless control of a PMSM are pointed out. The results clearly demonstrate the great potential of additive manufacturing in electrical engineering and the benefits for electrical machines.
Moderator:

Dr. Guido Adam, CEO, DMRC - Direct Manufacturing Research Center

Speaker:

Stefan Lammers, DMRC - Direct Manufacturing Research Center

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Platon 2

Digitisation:

From Layer Deposition To True 3D Printing – How To Scale-Up Direct Manufacturing To Serial Production Needs

Additive manufacturing is supposed to change the way we make our products in the future. The prospects coming with it are manifold and the stakes are high: higher production flexibility is expected to allow for a better production smoothing and coping with market volatility, products are intended to be more customized following build-to-order or even design-to-order business models. The brave new world of industrial production is pictured as scenarios with much more ad-hoc production, allowing for a radical reduction of overproduction and overstocked warehouses. However, in order to make all this happen, additive manufacturing must get out of its niche existence due to its limited volume production capabilities, unspeakably high raw material costs, and pseudo-flexibility in terms of production ramp-ups. The presentation gives an outlook and provides general principles for overcoming these hurdles. The theoretical pillars for a potential scale-up of additive manufacturing are explained, with a special focus on direct deposition technologies.
Moderator:

Christian-Friedrich Lindemann, Research Exploitation Manager, DMRC - Direct Manufacturing Research Center

Speaker:

Prof. Dr. Christoph Haag, Professor for Procurement & Value Chain Management, Rhine-Waal University

11.55 am

Session Change

12.00 pm
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal B

Technologies:

Process And Quality Supervision For EBM Production Applications

The orthopedic implant and the aerospace industry uses the EBM technology for series production since 2007. This production focus has brought an increasing demand for process and quality supervision, e.g. defect detection, and we describe some of the solutions Arcam has developed to meet these industry requirements. Like a high-resolution camera. This functions can be used for process surveillance and as a complement to other NDT methods. Additionally an X-ray sensor is integrated. This can determine beam parameters such as position, focus and beam shape with very high accuracy. Future application developments will have the possibility to include in-process monitoring.
Moderator:

Dr. Eric Klemp, COO, voestalpine Additive Manufacturing Center GmbH

Speaker:

Peter Jain, Managing Director, ARCAM

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal C

Applied Design:

Technology Examples Of The EDAG Light Cocoon: Function-Integrated Lightweight Structures In A Highly Flexible Production

  • Concept Car EDAG Light Cocoon as visionary approach to a compact dynamic electric sports car with a bionically optimised, additive manufactured vehicle structure combined with a weatherproof textile outer skin.
  • NextGen Spaceframe demonstrates a flexible BIW concept by additive manufacturing in combination with 3D-bending and laser joining
  • On-board charger with a hybrid power electronics housing and cooling structure
  • Functional model of the personalized and functional integrated GenLight headlamp
Moderator:

Dr. Guido Adam, CEO, DMRC - Direct Manufacturing Research Center

Speaker:

Dr.-Ing. Martin Hillebrecht, Head of CC Lightweight Design, Materials & Technologies, EDAG Engineering GmbH

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Platon 2

Digitisation:

iBus - An Integrated Business Model For Customer Driven Custom Product Supply Chain

The purpose of this presentation is to explain the role of 3D Printing within the EU H2020 funded innovation action project entitled “iBUS – an integrated business model for customer driven custom product supply chains” The main focus of iBUS is to drive sales for EU traditional toy and furniture manufacturers by leveraging internet based technologies, focusing on products that are safe, good quality and demonstrate high levels of design and innovation. In this new iBUS model for custom products consumers become designers, designing, customising and placing orders for their own products online within the iBUS cloud. The 3D printed products must be produced and shown to be compliant with required EN71 standard. Most manufacturing compliance standards for aerospace, children’s toys or for medical devices are designed on the basis of conventional manufacturing techniques. In the iBUS project the 3D printed products the customer must be able to have a similar confidence level as for other regulated product domains. These 3d printed products must meet the challenge of intensified competition from illegal, dangerous and fake products are making consumers, particularly parents of small children, wary of imported goods. The planned outcome from the iBUS project will create a new demand and supply network involving at least 100 organisations at the end of the project, and 1000 within 5 years after the project. The creation of the network will be enabled via equitable value sharing.
Moderator:

Christian-Friedrich Lindemann, Research Exploitation Manager, DMRC - Direct Manufacturing Research Center

Speaker:
12.30 pm

Session Change

12.35 pm
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal B

Technologies:

Safety In Additive Manufacturing

3D metal printing is becoming established as a production technology in more and more industries. Entire manufacturing centers with multiple machines and numerous machine operators are being created. Safety is a key aspect, no matter whether you are operating a single machine or multiple machines, but this is a crucial criterion for large companies in particular.

Additive manufacturing technology demands different safety measures in some cases to the known, established subtractive processes. This is firstly due to the new type of manufacturing and secondly to the materials which are to be processed, for example reactive powder materials. It is therefore all the more important to familiarize yourself with the safety aspects of this manufacturing process, especially as guidelines for users also exist in addition to regulations for manufacturers.

  • What particular aspects need to be considered with powder-bed-based 3D metal printing?
  • Which sources of danger exist with this manufacturing process?
  • What protective equipment is the correct equipment?
  • What needs to be observed during powder handling?
  • Which equipment should be used?

You will get answers to these and other questions relating to safety in additive manufacturing in this talk.

Moderator:

Dr. Eric Klemp, COO, voestalpine Additive Manufacturing Center GmbH

Speaker:

Ulrich Albanus, Director Global Service & Application, Concept Laser GmbH

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal C

Applied Design:

Dimensional Tolerances For Additive Manufacturing

Additive manufacturing creates parts in layers without using formative tools. Compared to established manufacturing processes, additive manufacturing offers many advantages. However, only a few research institutions and technology-leading companies use additive manufacturing for end-use part production because relevant challenges have not been sufficiently researched yet. Missing restrictions become apparent in the available geometrical accuracy. The objective of the investigation is the experimental determination of dimensional tolerances using standard parameters. Therefore, a methodical procedure was set up. Based on experimentally determined deviations, dimensional tolerances were derived. The experimental investigations were carried out for Laser Sintering (LS), Laser Melting (LM) and Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM). The underlying presentation focuses the results for FDM.
Moderator:

Dr. Guido Adam, CEO, DMRC - Direct Manufacturing Research Center

Speaker:

Frederick Knoop, Research Assistant, DMRC - Direct Manufacturing Research Center

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Platon 2

Digitisation:

Challenges In Digital Manufacturing

The manufacturing ecosystem is rapidly turning towards digital technologies. While digitization provides great benefits, most organizations find successful implementation challenging. In this presentation we discuss the main challenges and suggested solutions based on industry best-practices and case studies.
Moderator:

Christian-Friedrich Lindemann, Research Exploitation Manager, DMRC - Direct Manufacturing Research Center

Speaker:

Hans van Toor, Digital Manufacturing Consultant, Berenschot

1.05 pm

Lunch Break

2.20 pm
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal B

Afternoon Keynote:

Global Value Chains – How Does AM Influence The Factory Of The Future?

  • The Rapid Prototyping market strongly matures towards manufacturing applications.
  • Companies handle Additive Technologies with much more realistic expectations, the technology hype is history. Media starts losing interest.
  • We will see substantial changes in the Additive Manufacturing sphere – significant technological changes and a consolidation wave.
  • What does this mean for a continued industrialization? What is the impact towards global value chains and how does AM impact the factory of the future?
  • We’ll show you how EOS positions itself to lead this transition.
Moderator:

Christian-Friedrich Lindemann, Research Exploitation Manager, DMRC - Direct Manufacturing Research Center

Speaker:

Nikolai Zaepernick, Senior Vice President Central Europe, EOS GmbH

3.00 pm
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal B

Sponsored Session:

Hybrid LAM-Design - A Cost Effective Approach For Large Scale Structures

Frank Beckmann, Key Account Manager & Projektleitung: Automotive

3.10 pm

Coffee Break

3.40 pm
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal B

Podiumsdiskussion:

How Will Additive Manufacturing Affect Future Businesses And Value Chains?

Dr.-Ing. Martin Hillebrecht, Head of CC Lightweight Design, Materials & Technologies, EDAG Engineering GmbH

Dr.-Ing. Bernhard Langefeld, Partner, Roland Berger

Hans van Toor, Digital Manufacturing Consultant, Berenschot

Nikolai Zaepernick, Senior Vice President Central Europe, EOS GmbH

Frank Beckmann, Key Account Manager & Projektleitung: Automotive

4.10 pm

Session Change

4.15 pm
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal B

Finance And Market:

Adoption Of Additive Manufacturing In The Industrial Arena

Over the last years, the use of Selective Laser Melting (SLM) as a technology for manufacturing highly complex metal parts additively has been growing rapidly. Among others, these parts are used in jet engines, gas turbines and medical implants.

Several direct and indirect advantages compared to traditional manufacturing methods such as casting and subtractive methods make metal additive manufacturing increasingly economical for an ever wider range of applications.

SLM is a relatively new technology and is becoming increasingly viable for the production of end-use parts. However, there are several hurdles currently limiting a faster adoption of SLM as a technology for end-use part production. Overcoming these hurdles not only requires further improving the stability of the highly complex SLM manufacturing process but also the successful integration into existing production and quality management environments.

Close collaboration among machine suppliers, their customers and other partners is a crucial success factor for quickly tapping the vast market potential.

Moderator:

Christian-Friedrich Lindemann, Research Exploitation Manager, DMRC - Direct Manufacturing Research Center

Speaker:

Stefan Ritt, VP-Head of global marketing and communications, SLM Solutions GmbH

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal C

Materials & Testing:

Additive Manufacturing of Metallic Glasses

If a metallic melt is cooled fast enough to avoid the atomic ordering processes associated with crystallization, the disordered structure of the liquid freezes. The result is an amorphous metal also known as metallic glass. The absence of an ordered lattice structure results in a unique combination of properties: stronger than steels, highly elastic as polymers, often harder and more corrosion resistant as their crystalline counterparts, and thermoplastically formable. Recently it was demonstrated that metallic glasses can be produced by Additive Manufacturing. This talk gives an overview about this class of materials and discusses recent developments, challenges and potentials that emerge with Additive Manufacturing.
Moderator:

Jörg Sander, Airborne Equipment (Mechanical Design), Airbus Defence & Space

Speaker:

Moritz Stolpe, Project Leader, Heraeus

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Platon 2

Service Supplier:

Additive Manufacturing Business Models

The market of Additive Manufacturing is growing fast. Experts forecast growing rates of > 30% per year. Companies like GE, Airbus, Boeing or Google focus “3D-Printing” and see a viable alternative to conventional manufacturing. 3D-printed products are hyped as something special and valuable. What is the right AM business model? What are the benefits and the disadvantages of AM? What are the challenges?

A continuous process chain, an optimized product design, and innovative materials are the requirements for reasonable Direct Manufacturing. In this presentation the PROTIQ GmbH offers an insight in its daily work. As a case study the design of an injection mold is described. The combination of topology optimisation, conformal cooling and Additive Manufacturing leads to faster mold production, lower production costs and shorter cycle time in the process of injection molding.

Moderator:

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Franz-Josef Villmer, Professor for Product Development, Innovation Management and Rapid Technologies, Ostwestfalen-Lippe University of Applied Sciences

Speaker:

Johannes Lohn, PhD Student, PROTIQ GmbH – A Phoenix Contact Company

5.00 pm

Session Change

5.05 pm
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal B

Finance And Market:

Future Trends And Markets For Industrialized, Metal 3D Printing

The significant investments of large industrial players into 3D printing hard- and software underpin the relevance of this technology for selected high tech industries. Growth in this industry will remain at around 30% per year and will continue even at today's price levels for the next years due to the large untapped potentials. Factory planners are currently designing fully automated 3D printing factories and need to prototype solutions for unloading components, removal of support structures, health protection etc. Overall process efficiency and integrated solutions are becoming a key enabler and are now addressed as well by the leading software providers.
Moderator:

Christian-Friedrich Lindemann, Research Exploitation Manager, DMRC - Direct Manufacturing Research Center

Speaker:

Dr.-Ing. Bernhard Langefeld, Partner, Roland Berger

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal C

Materials & Testing:

New Plastic Materials For Laser Sintering – Increasing The Variety Of Materials

Laser sintering gets more and more importance as a small series production technique. However, there is only a little number of materials available for the process. In most cases parts are build up using polyamide 12. Alternative materials are seldom used. Reasons for that are high prices, poor mechanical part properties or a more difficult processing. Aim of the presented study was to qualify different new polymers for the laser sintering process. On the one hand the processing conditions, part properties and potential applications of a newly commercialized polypropylene powder are shown. On the other hand different polyamide 6 powders were analyzed and compared in regard of processing conditions in laser sintering and part quality.
Moderator:

Jörg Sander, Airborne Equipment (Mechanical Design), Airbus Defence & Space

Speaker:

Andreas Wegner, Lehrstuhl für Fertigungstechnik, Universität Duisburg-Essen

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Platon 2

Service Supplier:

Series Production with 3D Printing: “Complexity For Free”

This technology not only offers design freedom with optimized structures and surfaces; it has also tremendous savings potential for small and medium-sized production runs. Each printed part can be unique with low cost differences, offering customized products and limited series, accelerating product development and increasing production Efficiency.

An industrial standard is not achieved until reproducibility and quality are in balance through the material’s dimensional stability, homogeneity, density and strength. However, this requires an absolute command of the process. With respect to surface quality: As a rule, 3D blanks require reworking or finishing before product quality is high enough to be considered marketable. Coloring plastic laser sintered parts is a key factor for production in these cases. The color must be lightfast as well as water, UV and abrasion resistant. It should also stand up to sweat, which is very important for eyeglasses and jewelry. In recent years the eyewear industry in particular has increased its use of laser sintered eyeglass frames, as this makes it possible to quickly modify model designs and adapt colors to the latest trends. The short production time of approx. 9–11 workdays makes this an extremely interesting method of production.

The presentation is aimed at developers, designers, department managers and executives in all branches of small-series manufacturing along with artists who wish to leverage the advantages of the generative process in their own production.

Moderator:

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Franz-Josef Villmer, Professor for Product Development, Innovation Management and Rapid Technologies, Ostwestfalen-Lippe University of Applied Sciences

Speaker:

Ingrid Prestien, Managing Partner, CIPRES Technology Systems

5.35 pm

Session Change

5.40 pm
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal B

Finance And Market:

Additive Manufacturing - The Growing Interest?!

In various industrial fields Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies are already established as alternative production methods compared to traditional manufacturing methods. In addition to today’s hype driven by the media, there are still many fields of action which must be dealt with at present and in the future. These fields of action include, for example, research and development, the increasing industrial need for standardization and quality improvement of AM components. However, Additive Manufacturing will become more and more strategic and will also change the market and today’s business models in the future. Among other things, these topics will be addressed and discussed in this talk.
Moderator:

Christian-Friedrich Lindemann, Research Exploitation Manager, DMRC - Direct Manufacturing Research Center

Speaker:

Jan Sehrt, Senior Lecturer, University of Duisburg-Essen

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal C

Materials & Testing:

Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) And Other Quality Related Topics For Additive Manufacturing

Aerospace is the industry that other industries look to for a glimpse at what’s on the horizon. Aerospace has a long history of being an early adopter, innovator and investigator. What this industry was doing decades ago has now become commonplace, almost pedestrian. For example, the aerospace industry was the earliest adopter of carbon fiber, and it was the first to integrate CAD/CAM into its design process. There are many other examples that show that trends in aerospace are predictors of future trends in manufacturing across all industries.

3D printing has a growing influence over the way Airbus Group designs, builds and maintains its products. Ideal for small volumes and customized production, 3D printing makes lighter-weight, fully assembled components at a fraction of the cost and time compared to just a few years ago.

Parts can now be created with complex geometries and shapes that in many cases are impossible to create without 3D printing.

In Aerospace the main focus is today on printing metals. The focus here is on Titanium alloys, whereas Aluminium- and other metallic materials are under investigation, as well.

AM is already used in manufacturing of Aerospace parts. Airbus and Premium Aerotec for example got their first AM manufactured part out of Titanium being certified by the EASA for the use in the A400M. Even if this part is not critical to fatigue, it is a first step towards industrialisation of metallic printing. For sure more applications will follow, soon.

The process chain for AM has lots of single steps and several of these are influenced by Quality Assurance (QA) Testing and Non-Destructive Testing (NDT).

The following topics are discussed with this presentation:
  • Simulation of NDT capabilities during design
  • Database for material properties
  • Powder quality determination
  • New Testing needs (e.g. Pressure Tests, etc.)
  • Online-Monitoring and Big-Data approach
  • NDT technologies (Optical Methods, Penetrant Testing, X-Ray inspection, Computed Technology, etc.)
  • Submicron X-Ray
  • Moderator:

    Jörg Sander, Airborne Equipment (Mechanical Design), Airbus Defence & Space

    Speaker:

Holger Speckmann, CEO, Testia

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Platon 2

Service Supplier:

Smart Factory - Factory Of The Future

The Smart Factory concept integrates all technologies to produce several new business models for manufacturing industries. Amongst other things, it will enable highly customised products to be produced at acceptable unit costs and with much lower levels of emissions and environmental impact.

The landscape of the Smart Factory concept will feature complex and extensive networks linking suppliers, manufacturers and customers.

Within the Smart Factory either completely bespoke or most flexible processes will be most successful. H&H is developing a Smart Factory concept which will be fully digitalized, scalable and learning.

Moderator:

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Franz-Josef Villmer, Professor for Product Development, Innovation Management and Rapid Technologies, Ostwestfalen-Lippe University of Applied Sciences

Speaker:

Raphael Hoffmann, Managing Director, H&H

6.10 pm

Reception in Exhibit Hall

7.00 pm

End of First Conference Day


Day 2 - Friday - 3 February, 2017

Session descriptions day 2

8.00 am

Registration

9.00 am
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal B

Morning Keynote:

AM Perspectives - Not Bound To Earth

Johannes Gumpinger, Advanced Manufacturing Process Engineer, European Space Agency (ESA)

9.30 am
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal B

Featured Session:

The Journey Of Additive Manufacturing To Mainstream Production: Challenges And Opportunities For The European Industry

The presentation will briefly sketch out the main advancements in the use of additive manufacturing for metalworking processes and will shortly illustrated the main trends and dominant players in the metal additive manufacturing market. It will then delve into the non-technological barriers for the industrialization of additive manufacturing in the European industry. It will offer an insight into regulatory gaps across several areas, skills shortages and EU R&D challenges that need be addressed to foster the uptake of additive manufacturing in application sectors.
Moderator:

Dr. Eric Klemp, COO, voestalpine Additive Manufacturing Center GmbH

Speaker:

Filip Geerts, Director General, CECIMO

10.00 am

Coffee Break

10.25 am
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal B

European Perspective On AM:

A Strategic Vision For Europe In AM And 3D Printing: AM-Motion & FoFAM

Additive manufacturing in Europe is still a scattered landscape where all players need to be brought together if we would like to be competitive and overcome exiting barriers. An Strategic common vision, that goes beyond technology aspects, is needed. The overall objective of FoFAM and AM-Motion initiatives is to contribute to a rapid market uptake of AM technologies across Europe by connecting and upscaling existing initiatives and efforts, improving the conditions for large-scale, cross-regional demonstration and market deployment, and by involving a large number of key stakeholders. Final goal is to develop a strategy and set up the pillars for its efficient implementation that, ultimately, will contribute to reinforcing the European ecosystem of AM.
Moderator:

Christian-Friedrich Lindemann, Research Exploitation Manager, DMRC - Direct Manufacturing Research Center

Speaker:

Dr. Paula Queipo, Director of External Relations, PRODINTEC

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal C

Disruption And Changes:

A Direct Photonic Production - Additive Manufacturing Of The Future

Prof. Dr. Johannes Schleifenbaum, Digital Additive Production, RWTH Aachen University

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Platon 2

Product Optimization - From Earth To Space:

Real Application Examples

Fabian Riß, Production Technology Materials & Processes, Airbus Safran Launchers GmbH

10.55 am

Session Change

11.00 am
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal B

European Perspective On AM:

Talent Challenges Impacting The Evolution Of Industry 4.0

The presentation will take a look at some of the key challenges faced by organisations with the implementation of technological change driven by Industry 4.0. We will look at the key skills organisations highlight as essential, including both technical and non technical requirements. We will propose potential short, medium and long term solutions that can help overcome the skills gap and offer competitive advantage for early adopters.
Moderator:

Christian-Friedrich Lindemann, Research Exploitation Manager, DMRC - Direct Manufacturing Research Center

Speaker:

Nick Pearce, Director, Alexander Daniels Global

Juan Miguel Ramirez, Head of ADG Additive Manufacturing, Alexander Daniels Global

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal C

Disruption And Changes:

Taking Control – The Challenge of Process and Quality

Additive Manufacturing has entered serial production and high demanding industries like aerospace. With this change it is crucial to adapt to the corresponding standards. One of the main challenges are reliable solutions for quality and process control. OEMs and manufacturers are already racing towards these demands. Taking control in Additive Manufacturing includes getting the process right, optimizing it and ensuring it is executed the way you intended. The Materialise Control Platforms allows OEM’s and R&D departments to control their machine by tuning and adapting its behavior. Many organizations generate an enormous pile of data during the build process and manually run through it to ensure their parts are built as intended. Materialise Inspector makes this more efficient and less knowledge demanding, reducing costs and increasing certainty of build quality. We will share some cases where build simulation within Inspector has allowed us to optimize the build job, leading to shorter build times and less crashes.
Moderator:

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Franz-Josef Villmer, Professor for Product Development, Innovation Management and Rapid Technologies, Ostwestfalen-Lippe University of Applied Sciences

Speaker:

Vincent Wanhu Yang, Product Manager – Inspector, Materialise GmbH

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Platon 2

Product Optimization - From Earth To Space:

Bionics Designs – Disruptive Technology In Aerospace

Will Bionic Designs with enabling AM-technology become the next ""big disruptor"" in the aerospace industry? The aerospace industry leads the development of AM-usage and sees today enormous weight saving potential to drastically reduce the cost for airlines. The next aircraft generation enters service in 2016/2017 and the next new programs will be launched in 7-10years. The time from now will become key for future success. The development of R&D skills of this enabling technology, industrializing/stabilizing the manufacturing and combine functions and data sources are the main topics in focus. All in all AM can enable the industry to develop brand new and effective aircraft designs for a CO2 reduced future.
Moderator:

Dr. Guido Adam, CEO, DMRC - Direct Manufacturing Research Center

Speaker:

Klaus Müller, Senior Advisor, Laserzentrum Nord

11.30 am

Session Change

11.35 am
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal B

European Perspective On AM:

Turning Digital Into Physical: The Role Of AM And 3D-Printing In The Digitisation Of Industries

Germán Esteban Muñiz, Research Programme Officer, DG Research and Innovation

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal C

Disruption And Changes:

Automated Design For Orthopedic Devices – Core Element Of Disruptive Change?

Additive manufacturing technologies open up Mass Customization, the mass manufacturing of customized products. An absolute prerequisite for this is the cost-effective supply of 3D data of the customized products. The presentation illustrates how to design automated processes for customization and what consequences will arise for the orthopedic industry in particular, and for products with added value through customization in general. The disruptive potential for this industry will be worked out and an idea of future developments will be presented.
Moderator:

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Franz-Josef Villmer, Professor for Product Development, Innovation Management and Rapid Technologies, Ostwestfalen-Lippe University of Applied Sciences

Speaker:

Volker Junior, CEO, phoenix GmbH & Co. KG

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Platon 2

Product Optimization - From Earth To Space:

BDLI Network Additive Manufacturing

Jens Telgkamp, Research Leader on Additive Manufacturing / 3D printing, AIRBUS

12.05 pm

Session Change

12.10 pm
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal B

European Perspective On AM:

Experiences From European Projects: Linking Research On ICT And Manufacturing Technologies

Additive Manufacturing is often understood as a representative technology for digitization in product creation – one of the key elements of Industry 4.0 and Factories of the Future. Sometimes entitled Digital Direct Manufacturing, the whole process chain from product ideas to the manufacturing process is done by digital tools and formats. By multi-material processes and injection of electronic elements, smart products can be produced by AM. AM facilitates new business models by using the cyber space, connecting people and services in global value and supply networks. Research is driving this evolution: The European Commission and national governments fund numerous projects which contribute to strengthening European players. Projects are targeting new production systems and advanced manufacturing, but there is also significant advancement in the area of Information and Communication Technology enabling innovative production. This presentation will provide an overview of the complementary research domains. It will highlight how synergies can be used to enhance industrial processes.
Moderator:

Christian-Friedrich Lindemann, Research Exploitation Manager, DMRC - Direct Manufacturing Research Center

Speaker:

Dr.-Ing. Jens Pottebaum, Senior Researcher, Paderborn University, Heinz Nixdorf Institut

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal C

Disruption And Changes:

It's Not All About Weight Reduction - Additive Manufacturing In Railway Business

With depreciations periods of 25 years, service lifes of more than 50 years, vehicles from different manufactures and different years of construction, spare part supply becomes a real challenge for the leading railway company in Europe. The lack of critical spare parts creates delays in maintenance workflow or downtime for whole vehicles which mean financial losses and possible customer dissatisfaction at the end of the day. But also small components in comfort areas can affect the travelling experience of passenger. To improve spare parts supply especially for old parts, that are no longer manufactured by the supplier and to benefit from the advantages of Additive Manufacturing in other business areas, Deutsche Bahn AG set up a joint initiative to explore application fields and business models across group - with great success.
Moderator:

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Franz-Josef Villmer, Professor for Product Development, Innovation Management and Rapid Technologies, Ostwestfalen-Lippe University of Applied Sciences

Speaker:

Florens Lichte, Head of Additive Manufacturing, Deutsche Bahn AG, DB Fahrzeuginstandhaltung GmbH

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Platon 2

Product Optimization - From Earth To Space:

Product Optimization With Additive Manufacturing - From Aerospace To Everyday Applications

Additive Manufacturing (AM) is a promising technology and has advanced over the last years in terms of cost- and product optimization potential. The advantages of AM have been identified already in early stages from the aerospace and space industry. Here a strong interest in lightweight design is explained by financial revenues resulting from low buy-to-fly ratios and decreased part weight. Hence, these branches may allocate large budgets for technology development.

Based on this motivation, fundamental work on the design of very complex lightweight load and stress optimized structural elements e.g. for satellites have been performed. The result is a methodology for an easy to use and cost efficient topology optimization-process, which will be presented in the speech.

Based on this methodology not only aero-/space parts are discussed, but also industrial applications (e.g. from machine tools). The speech will show the transfer from results in the aerospace sector into everyday industrial applications. With regards to the cost development, AM will soon be seen not only in space but in earthbound machines at the shop floor.

Moderator:

Dr. Guido Adam, CEO, DMRC - Direct Manufacturing Research Center

Speaker:

Thomas Reiher, Research Assistant, Paderborn University – DMRC

12.40 pm

Lunch Break

2.00 pm
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal B

Afternoon Keynote:

Function Defines Form. Increasing Value Through Functional Design.

Industrialization of Additive Manufacturing is accelerating: increased building space, more materials, better machine technology, increased quality management and automation in post-processing give technology impulses in the next years. Further, AM developments demonstrate that this technology has additional potential beyond just being an alternative manufacturing method for existing parts and designs: Application-driven re-invention of equipment, with parts bundling and integration of several functions into the AM-made part leverage the full potential, at its best through a digital CAE/CAD workflow. This enables appropriate business cases for AM in high value applications, by more sustainable and cost-efficient manufacturing and operations.
Speaker:

Dr. Christoph Kiener, Principal Expert Sustainability Lifecycle Engineering, Siemens AG

2.30 pm
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal B

Panel Discussion:

New Products Enabled By Additive Manufacturing - Where Do We Go? How Will They Affect Us And Our Businesses?

Dr. Guido Adam, CEO, DMRC - Direct Manufacturing Research Center

Dr. Christoph Kiener, Principal Expert Sustainability Lifecycle Engineering, Siemens AG

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Franz-Josef Villmer, Professor for Product Development, Innovation Management and Rapid Technologies, Ostwestfalen-Lippe University of Applied Sciences

Jörg Sander, Airborne Equipment (Mechanical Design), Airbus Defence & Space

Nick Pearce, Director, Alexander Daniels Global

3.00 pm

Session Change

3.05 pm
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal B

Digital And Virtual Engineering:

Towards Efficiency In Engineering: Opportunities And Challenges In Combining Additive Manufacturing And Virtual Engineering

Most often, a technology is seen as a solution to obtain physical objects. This is not wrong but this is not enough with respect to digitalization of industry. Virtual Engineering has emerged about 20 years ago and provides solutions to couple the physical evolution of the product and the information needed to manage and to control the different steps of the process over the value chain. In the field of additive manufacturing, a set of technologies is dedicated to functions that help in increasing the performance and the robustness of the global process chain with respect to economic criteria and productivity. The success of such approach implies the creation of a framework that relies on models and methods that help in developing relevant optimization of the total use of the potential advantages of additive manufacturing.
Moderator:

Dr.-Ing. Jens Pottebaum, Senior Researcher, Paderborn University, Heinz Nixdorf Institut

Speaker:

Prof. Alain Bernard, Professor at IRCCyN, Ecole Centrale de Nantes

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal C

Legal:

Securing Your Intellectual Property And Business Secrets In Additive Manufacturing Processes, Avoiding Liability For Product Defects

Companies of all sizes are embracing additive manufacturing and looking for ways to incorporate it into their production processes and supply chains. While great attention is paid to the technical aspects of this challenge, the legal implications are often ignored with costly consequences. With additive manufacturing changing processes proactive contract management is a must. Manufacturing products additively also often requires a complete or partial re-design for tapping into the full potential of digital production processes. This task and the improvement of certain product features are often outsourced to service providers, suppliers or freelancers. While this approach is often appropriate and cost effective, it also demands special attention to securing intellectual property in work results. Andreas Leupold from Leupold Legal, 3D-Printing Law Firm of the Year 2016 in Germany provides essential guidance on securing your intellectual property and business secrets in the digital supply chain. He also shows what can be done to prevent business secrets from being divulged to third parties and explains why adhering to technical standards is not enough to avoid or limit your liability for product defects that occur in industrial 3D-printing.
Moderator:

Christian-Friedrich Lindemann, Research Exploitation Manager, DMRC - Direct Manufacturing Research Center

Speaker:

Dr. Andreas Leupold, Founder, Leupold Legal

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Platon 2

Defense:

Experience with Additive Manufacturing And Future Developments at DBD

Results for rapid manufacturing of missile parts are presented and ideas for qualification are discussed. Examples are presented for precision parts and complex parts. One focus is set on compliant mechanisms, another is put on the dynamic structural testing of a heavily loaded printed primary structure. The lecture closes with a forecast how to remove obsolences by reproducing spare parts by 3D Printing.
Moderator:

Jörg Sander, Airborne Equipment (Mechanical Design), Airbus Defence & Space

Speaker:

Peter Gerd Fisch, Diehl BGT Defence GmbH

3.35 pm

Coffee Break

4.05 pm
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal B

Digital And Virtual Engineering:

The New Shape Of Product Development And Manufacturing Processes With Additive Manufacturing And Industry 4.0

Most of the traditional rules of processes in development and manufacturing of products will change with the entry of Additive Manufacturing, Cyber-physical systems and the Industrial Internet. The keynote highlights the relevant effects of these new technological developments on processes, employees, products and markets. A first glimpse of new processes is possible in the Potsdam ACI (Application Center Industry 4.0), an advanced experimental smart factory of the future.
Moderator:

Dr.-Ing. Jens Pottebaum, Senior Researcher, Paderborn University, Heinz Nixdorf Institut

Speaker:

Prof. Dr. Norbert Gronau, University of Potsdam

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal C

Legal:

Production Integrated Markings For Traceability Of AM Parts In The Context Of Industry 4.0

Traceability is often mentioned as one fundamental requirement to reach the vision of Industry 4.0, the next industrial revolution. As Additive Manufacturing (AM) is a technology with high relevance in the scope of Industry 4.0 this presentation focuses production-integrated markings for traceability of additively manufactured parts . Even industries that are not focusing on products with critical functionality using markings for quality management and liability exclusion can benefit a lot from identifiability of products. Markings can be understood as a kind of individualization of parts. As individualization does not increase production costs when using AM and the effort for integration of markings can be minimized by software in particular for high batch production, product marking should be an obligatory process step. Various applications that can be achieved due to markings as well as different ways to embed a marking at least partly automatically will be shown.
Moderator:

Christian-Friedrich Lindemann, Research Exploitation Manager, DMRC - Direct Manufacturing Research Center

Speaker:

Ulrich Jahnke, Research Assistant, DMRC - Direct Manufacturing Research Center

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Platon 2

Defense:

Deployed Printer Systems For Armed Forces

Additive layer manufacturing is one of the technologies that is significantly influencing the way of how products will be designed and how products will be delivered to the point of need. This covers processes that deal with civilian, as well as military, applications.

Based on the requirements of military applications, an autonomous mobile 3D printing solution for metal parts is drafted that allows the supply of spare parts and special parts close to the point of need. The approach is going to render an end-2-end solution suited to comprise a mobile shelter, pre- and post-processing steps and a laser-printing system completed by a set of supporting services.

Beneath the current status of the project, the currently limitating factors will be highlighted. A prospect of applicable solutions and next steps will be shown.

Moderator:

Jörg Sander, Airborne Equipment (Mechanical Design), Airbus Defence & Space

Speaker:

Michael Grytz, Head of New Services, Airbus DS Electronics and Border Security GmbH

4.35 pm

Session Change

4.40 pm
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal B

Digital And Virtual Engineering:

Unlocking The Potential Of Additive Manufacturing In A Connected World

Main adoption drivers of the AM technology (personalization, complex geometries and decentralized production) will originate game-changing innovations in the next years. However, this will not succeed to take full advantage to the possibilities of the new technology unless a mindset change occurs in the conception and design of products. Security issues concerning the misuse of intellectual property have to be solved, especially if the printing of a part is done by a third party. Besides, developments to create standard and exchangeable file formats, certification processes and digital platforms will lead to a firm integration of AM into the manufacturing area.
Moderator:

Dr.-Ing. Jens Pottebaum, Senior Researcher, Paderborn University, Heinz Nixdorf Institut

Speaker:

Elvira Leon, Senior Solution Architect, ATOS

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal C

Legal:

3D Hubs - A European Production Network

Organizations often rely on several suppliers to complete even a single product iteration. Additional complexities are introduced when working with multiple engineering teams, multiple material needs, and spread across multiple geographies. Anything less than perfect coordination can frequently lead to project delays or unforeseen project expenses. 3D Hubs' new enterprise solution aims to facilitate rapid prototyping by introducing one centralized platform for all decentralized manufacturing needs.
Moderator:

Christian-Friedrich Lindemann, Research Exploitation Manager, DMRC - Direct Manufacturing Research Center

Speaker:

Dan Grigoras, Director of Business Development, 3D Hubs

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Platon 2

Defense:

Challenges On The Way Towards The Usage Of AM For Armed Forces

The use of additive manufacturing may help to improve the logistic supply especially for longer-lived equipment. Furthermore, it has the potential for new designs and further tailoring of technical equipment. But for the usage of additive manufacturing for demanding applications in military missions, a sufficient technology maturity has to be established. Therefore it is necessary to identify and solve open issues in the whole process chain from generating the data up to quality assurance. In the talk the authors would like to present their activities facing the challenges for the usage of AM. Examples for AM parts for military equipment are presented and a detailed view on additive manufactured materials is given.
Moderator:

Jörg Sander, Airborne Equipment (Mechanical Design), Airbus Defence & Space

Speaker:

Dr. Matthias Bleckmann, Wehrwissenschaftliches Institut für Werk- und Betriebsstoffe (WIWeB)

5.10 pm

Session Change

5.15 pm
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Rheinlandsaal B

Digital And Virtual Engineering:

Multiscale Additive Manufacturing Simulation Solution: From Material Engineering To Confident Lightweight Design

Additive layer manufacturing of plastics is experiencing a paradigm shift. Following its initial development in rapid visual prototyping, the industry is now looking into the technology as a full production technique to achieve tailored design but also new lightweighting solutions which are not viable with other manufacturing methods.

To support this transition, the engineering workflow which is daily applied for traditional manufacturing processes needs to be replicated and adapted to additive manufacturing. Printer manufacturers, material suppliers and end-users need predictive simulation tools to bring the additive manufacturing efficiency and performance to the next level required by the industry. This paper presents a holistic simulation approach for additive manufacturing of plastics and composites, covering material engineering, process simulation and structural engineering of both SLS and FDM type of processes.

Additive manufacturing modeling is a true multi-scale challenge. Insights on how the simulation of the 3D-printing process can be solved via multiscale thermo-mechanical models are presented. The numerical simulation follows the real printing workflow, takes into account all process parameters and allows to predict the deformed shape of the part, residual stresses and the process microstructure, such as porosities distribution and printing direction. Some optimization techniques are further considered to minimize part warpage.

Multiscale material modeling techniques applied to additive manufacturing of polymers (unfilled and reinforced) will be detailed. Applications include the computation of the effective mechanical response of lattices, the homogenization of the material behavior of reinforced polymers and the build-up of nonlinear material models as a function of the printer toolpath by reverse-engineering experimental tensile datasets.

Finally, to bridge the gap between process and as-printed part performance, a strongly coupled process-structure methodology will be shown, as key enabler for predictive simulation of new lightweight high performance designs. This approach links the material anisotropy, the process-induced microstructure and the part performance. The part strength sensitivity to the printing direction is demonstrated and validation against experimental tests is achieved.

Moderator:

Dr.-Ing. Jens Pottebaum, Senior Researcher, Paderborn University, Heinz Nixdorf Institut

Speaker:

Olivier Lietaer, Business Development Engineer for Additive Manufacturing, e-Xstream

Sessions are held in English.

No Session

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Platon 2

Defense:

Additive Manufacturing: What Are The Risks To (Inter)National Security?

AM technology offers great advantages, but it also comes with certain risks to national and international security. It is already possible today to fully “print” small arms and to partially print drones, guided missiles and other weapon systems. Moreover, 3D-printing, in a sense, is the epitome of "dual use" technology that may allow certain countries or non-state entities to circumvent international sanction regimes. This session provides an overview of which potential risks AM poses from a national and international security perspective and what is being discussed as means to mitigate such risks.
Moderator:

Jörg Sander, Airborne Equipment (Mechanical Design), Airbus Defence & Space

Speaker:

Marco Fey, Research Associate, Leibniz-Institut Hessische Stiftung Friedens- und Konfliktforschung (HSFK)

5.45 pm

End of Inside 3D Printing 2017