ATTENTION! You are currently viewing information about Inside 3D Printing 2015! Go to the forthcoming conference page.
EN  |  DE

DÜSSELDORF | 2nd – 3rd February, 2017

EXPERIENCE INDUSTRY 4.0

Agenda Overview 2015

See all Session Descriptions

Day 1 - Tuesday - 3 March, 2015

Session descriptions day 1

8.00 am

Registration + Welcome Coffee

9.00 am
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section D

Morning Keynote with Terry Wohlers

Additive Manufacturing State of the Industry

Countless corporations, government agencies, researchers, and others are investing in additive manufacturing (AM) technology in ways that have not been seen in the past. Many are trying to understand where it is headed and how they fit in. Some of the biggest companies and brands in the world, such as Adobe, Airbus, Amazon, Autodesk, Boeing, GE, Google, Lockheed Martin, and UPS, have made some level of commitment to AM. HP, for example, is in the process of introducing an entirely new 3D printing technology that is 10 times faster than competitive machines. We are finding that product development and manufacturing organizations that ignore AM could be at a distinct disadvantage if their competitors embrace it successfully.
Speaker:

Terry Wohlers, Principal Consultant and President, Wohlers Associates, Inc.

9.50 am
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section D

Sponsored Session:

9.50-10.00 am: Latest Developments in the Productivity of SLM-Technology

Today SLM-technology has been accepted in the production environment in the industry. Now the increase of productivity and reliability has to be demonstrated in every days use. This presentation will describe the development of multilaser technology to achieve this goal and will also talk about peripheral devices such as powder supply and secondary handling devices. Main industries using this technology today already are aerospace and medical technology. The presentation will make references to such applications in daily use.
Moderator:

Eric Klemp, Business Director, Direct Manufacturing Research Center (DMRC)

Speaker:

Stefan Ritt, Export, Sales und Marketing Manager, SLM Solutions GmbH


10:05-10:10 Materialise’s Unique Position in the 3D Print Industry

With its headquarters in Belgium and branches worldwide (amongst two in Germany), Materialise is a provider of Additive Manufacturing (AM) software solutions and sophisticated 3D printing services in a wide variety of industries, including healthcare, automotive, aerospace, art and design and consumer products. Materialise has been playing an active role in the field of AM since 1990, through its involvement in AM for industrial and medical applications, by providing biomedical and clinical solutions such as medical image processing and surgical simulations and by developing unique solutions for its customers' prototyping, production, and medical needs. Materialise takes a unique position in the industry by linking our customers’ idea for additive manufacturing to any type of AM machine, regardless whether the printer is at the customer or we print the parts on one of our >120 AM machines.
Moderator:

Eric Klemp, Business Director, Direct Manufacturing Research Center (DMRC)

Speaker:

Jurgen Laudus, Director, Additive Manufacturing Services Business Unit , Materialise

10.10 am

Morning Coffee Break

10.50 am
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section D

Track 1

3D Printing Beyond Cinderella’s Glass Slipper.

Cinderella must have had a very advanced 3D printer in the disguise of a hazelnut tree when she got ready for the ball. Not only could this printer process multiple materials, but it was fast as well. Present day printers would take hours to produce prints of this size. The layer by layer approach allows design freedom but not speed. Cinderella would have missed the party. HP is exploring how to modify existing printing processes to speed them up. We will present two concepts and the philosophy behind them.
Moderator:

Eric Klemp, Business Director, Direct Manufacturing Research Center (DMRC)

Speaker:

Dr. Susanne Klein, Principal Scientist, HP Labs

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section C

Track 2

Is 3D Printing Ready for Aerospace Production?

Mass production with 3D printing or additive manufacturing is already known from the dental or consumer industry and has started in the past few years to be a manufacturing technology in the aerospace industry. Large OEM´s have taken strategic positions to get hands on this technology. To certify 3D printing in the aviation industry a lot of important questions need to be answered: Are additive manufacturing technologies ready for aerospace production? What are the critical factors to pass space and aviation quality gates? How do typical jet engine makers approach the 100% quality requirement? What approaches help to generate confidence in the new technology? Obtain initial answers, a technology overview and industry feedback.
Moderator:

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Franz-Josef Villmer, Professor of Product Development, Innovation Management and Rapid Technologies , Ostwestfalen-Lippe University of Applied Sciences

Speaker:

Udo Behrendt, Key Account Manager Aerospace, EOS GmbH

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Room 1

Track 3

AM in the Luxury Goods Sector: A Case Study of the Development of Porcelain Products in Taiwan

AM has brought hype and hope. In this talk, personal experience will be shared regarding how the AM technology has been applied in the development of fine porcelain and helps to turn this ancient craft into fashionable business. Advantages of introducing this digital process and barriers within the organization will be also discussed.
Moderator:

Christian-Friedrich Lindemann, Research Assistant, Paderborn University – DMRC

Speaker:

Prof. Wei-nien Su, Assistant Professor, Graduate Institute of Applied Science and Technology at National Taiwan University of Science and Te

11.20 am
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section D

Track 1

Leading the Additive Manufacturing Industry

Additive manufacturing has been connected with many desired trends from re-shoring to de-centralized manufacturing. It has been named the catalyst for a new industrial revolution based on new supply chain models and on demand manufacturing. The hype and the level of expectation may have overshadowed the real and immediate benefits this technology brings to designers, engineers and manufacturers. In our presentation we will discuss how additive is re-shaping the way we make things today. From breaking the shackles of design for manufacturing to mass customization. We will demonstrate and argue the economic case for low volume end use parts, and will show dramatic cost savings in tooling and injection molding. The presentation will tell the story of several companies who were able to decrease costs, compress time to market, and use the technology for customized end use parts. As a market leader we are bound to do more than elaborate on the success of our customers. We believe that 3D printing will change the way we manufacture things. Thus we will detail the steps Stratasys is taking today to create value for manufacturers and to create a solid infrastructure for the manufacturing of the future. The next step in the industrial evolution is here, today and it is led by Stratasys.
Moderator:

Eric Klemp, Business Director, Direct Manufacturing Research Center (DMRC)

Speaker:

Andy Langfeld, EMEA VP of Finance and Sales Operations, Stratasys

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section C

Track 2

Additive Manufacturing and Direct Write in Aerospace Environments

Additive Manufacturing (AM) and Direct Write (DW) Technologies have the potential to alter the way we think about aerospace subcomponents with respect to: design, functionality, fabrication, and performance. New design methodologies are required to be developed in conjuncture with the fabrication processes in order to take full advantage of these new manufacturing techniques. Aerospace environments are extreme and any component needs to be able to function under all conditions, which requires extensive testing for performance and reliability. Possible uses of DW technologies may be used in aerospace by distributed electronics, replacing conventional components, and putting electronics in places not previously possible. Extensive testing of AM & DW components is needed not only for mechanical survivability but electrical performance is require for DW as well. A discussion of what Boeing sees as some potential AM & DW applications, necessary advancements in AM & DW processes, and necessary testing needed to use these technologies in aerospace will be discussed.
Moderator:

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Franz-Josef Villmer, Professor of Product Development, Innovation Management and Rapid Technologies , Ostwestfalen-Lippe University of Applied Sciences

Speaker:

Allen Wilson, Materials & Processes engineer, Boeing

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Room 1

Track 3

The Humanitarian Potential of 3D Printing

The Uplift Prize aims to reduce poverty for millions of people by accelerating the diffusion of high scalable technologies such as 3D printing through innovation prizes. Each innovation prize is constructed to have a very high impact per dollar and zero overhead costs. For more, visit kprize.wordpress.com.
Moderator:

Christian-Friedrich Lindemann, Research Assistant, Paderborn University – DMRC

Speaker:

Kartik Gada, Creator, Uplift Prize

11.50 am

Session Change

12.00 pm
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section D

Track 1

Additive Manufacturing for a Finished Part Quality

The additive manufacturing enables new possibilities with reference to complexity and individuality in the production of e.g. integral components as well as similar lightweight parts made out of metallic high performance materials. SAUER LASERTEC, a company of the DMG MORI SEIKI AG, integrates the additive laser deposition process for the first time in a full-fledged 5 axis milling machine. This innovative hybrid solution is so far unique on the global market. For this procedure, a deposition process with a metal powder nozzle is used that allows complete machining of almost all materials without a process chamber and is up to 10 times faster than generating a part with a powder bed process. Beyond that, the manufacturing of overhanging structures is possible without supporting structures. Therefore the flexibility of additive manufacturing is smartly combined with the precision of a milling / turning process. The flexible changing between laser and milling process enables also the direct processing of component segments that are not accessible anymore on the finished part. Yet the additive processes were limited to the manufacturing of prototypes and small parts. The combination of additive manufacturing with powder nozzle and milling / turning process on one machine enables complete new applications and geometry possibilities. Especially larger components that had a high rate of milling or turning can now be manufactured economically with this innovation.
Moderator:

Eric Klemp, Business Director, Direct Manufacturing Research Center (DMRC)

Speaker:

Friedemann Lell, Sauer GmbH LASERTEC

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section C

Track 2

Additive Manufacturing: Aerospace Applications and Challenges

Additive manufacturing is increasingly considered for manufacturing high quality aerospace parts. The presentation covers the Airbus Group approach to introduce additively manufactured metal parts into our products. The business case is formulated on the basis of weight, cost and quality drivers. The main challenges currently faced are explained on the basis of the AM value chain. Detailed examples are given in the field of design for manufacturing, post processing (surface treatments) and quality (effect-of-defects).
Moderator:

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Franz-Josef Villmer, Professor of Product Development, Innovation Management and Rapid Technologies , Ostwestfalen-Lippe University of Applied Sciences

Speaker:

Claudio Dalle Donne, Head of Technical Capability Centre “Metallic Technologies and Surface Engineering”, Airbus Group Innovations

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Room 1

Track 3

3D Scanning Technologies to Streamline Your Business

When it comes to 3D scanning technologies, innovation, customization and quality control are what it is all about. In this session, we’ll explore fully integrated solutions for industries such as reverse engineering, prototyping, as well as consumer facing businesses including 3D body scanning for printing 3D selfies. Join us for a highly informative session and discover how the speed and precision of the latest 3D scanners can be used to improve your business.
Moderator:

Christian-Friedrich Lindemann, Research Assistant, Paderborn University – DMRC

Speaker:

Leo Volkov, CBDO, Artec 3D

12.30 pm
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section D

Track 1

Industrial Additive Manufacturing – Innovations and Trends

With the ARBURG Plastic Freeforming (AKF) now standard granulates can be used for the production of components. This enables a wide range of options: from customised colours or materials with medical approvals, through to customer-specific material blends. In order to manufacture technical components, properties such as tensile strength and toughness are of primary importance. Current areas of application for this technology are, for example, components with jointed structures, housings, tactile components and components made from elastic materials, such as bellows. Complex components with overhanging structures can be achieved using a water-soluble supporting material. The individualisation of moulded parts through subsequent processing using the freeformer opens up completely new possibilities. This combination of injection moulding processes with ARBURG Plastic Freeforming now the manufacturing of innovative components are possible. One application of this type was displayed at the FAKUMA trade fair, in which a moulded part was individualised using the freeformer. In this specific case, individualised signing was additively applied to a pair of scissors.
Moderator:

Eric Klemp, Business Director, Direct Manufacturing Research Center (DMRC)

Speaker:

Dr. Oliver Keßling, Head of Plastic Freeforming, ARBURG

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section C

Track 2

Additive Manufacturing – Added Design Value

Mass production made high quality goods generally affordable though standardisation and uniformity. The flexibility of digital design and manufacturing technologies allows us now to the reassess relationships between consumer, manufacture and designer. 3D printing can offer bespoke solutions, industrially manufactured or simply printed at home. Products can be tailored to an individual’s need or desire whilst till benefiting from mass-market economies of scale. Like-for-like additive layer-build technologies cannot match the cost and performance of convention high volume manufacturing. But it is the added value that digital manufacturing can bring that justifies these premium processes.
Moderator:

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Franz-Josef Villmer, Professor of Product Development, Innovation Management and Rapid Technologies , Ostwestfalen-Lippe University of Applied Sciences

Speaker:

Lionel T Dean, Founder and Creative Director, FutureFactories

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Room 1

Track 3

3D-Copying – What's Possible Today?

An actual overview about the available Technologies to turn existing objects into 3D Printers. Which type of hardware and Software leads to the expected results. Applications from Medical, Art, Spareparts in Industry and customised consumer parts will be covered.
Moderator:

Christian-Friedrich Lindemann, Research Assistant, Paderborn University – DMRC

Speaker:

Antonius Köster, CEO, Antonius Köster GmbH & Co. KG

1.00 pm

Lunch

2.00 pm
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section D

Afternoon Keynote with Prof. Claus Emmelmann

Light Engineering by Bionic Additive Manufacturing

Due to its high geometrical freedom additive manufacturing technologies offer a significant potential for lightweight applications, especially in the field of aviation. Yet, process specific restrictions and guidelines for the design, especially for metallic lightweight structures, are only marginally spread. Addressing these shortcomings the presentation will show a design approach for 3D printing. Supporting the designer in load and manufacturing suitable solutions by the implementation of DFM guidelines, structural biomimetic and topology optimization is the focus of this approach.
Moderator:

Eric Klemp, Business Director, Direct Manufacturing Research Center (DMRC)

Speaker:

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Claus Emmelmann, CEO, LZN Laser Zentrum Nord GmbH

2.30 pm
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section D

Sponsored Session:

2:30-2:40pm: Design For The Freedom & Unlock the True Potential of 3D-Printing!

Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies introduce a new dimension of structural freedom and cheap complexity into the manufacturing environment. But the actual part design is often lacking an inherent added value that was designed into the part. Whatever the motivation is to apply AM if it is either extreme performance increases (i.e. a more complex shape leveraging the lightweight potential) or part cost reduction or functional integration, the initial question remains always the same:
From here do we get the structural inspiration? 3 key challenges have to be taken:

1. How can a designer come up with the best possible shape? We answer this with the “Industrialization” of Topology Optimization inside of our tool INSPIRE.
2. How can the engineer draw it in a CAD system? A problem conventional CAD systems have is solved. As they rely on boolean operations of simple geometric entities, it is prohibitive time consuming to capture organic shapes like the ones from a topology optimization. The flexibility of EVOLVE and its new polymesh design technology reduces design lead time from weeks to days or even hours.
3. How can we consider the new manufacturing constraints? Despite all the freedom AM can provide, there are new Manufacturing constraints to consider. Together with our partners from industry and research we take our roll in addressing this educative challenge.

Altair provides the enabler to unlock the true potential of AM with a seamless process captured in a unique set of tools.
Moderator:

Eric Klemp, Business Director, Direct Manufacturing Research Center (DMRC)

Speaker:

Mirko Bromberger, Marketing Director, Altair Engineering GmbH


2:40-2:50pm: Three steps to the perfect AM-part

Albert Rundel, RENISHAW GmbH

2.55 pm
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section D

Panel Discussion

The impact of AM in the Aircraft industry

In this panel discussion, industry experts will answer these important questions: How can AM benefit from the aircraft industry and vice versa? What are the constrains? What is already in use? Which are the real flying parts? What has to happen next? What can be transferred from Aircraft-industry into other industries?
Moderator:

Eric Klemp, Business Director, Direct Manufacturing Research Center (DMRC)

Speaker:

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Claus Emmelmann, CEO, LZN Laser Zentrum Nord GmbH

Jörg Sander, Airborne Equipment (Mechanical Design), Airbus Defence & Space

Stefan Ritt, Export, Sales und Marketing Manager, SLM Solutions GmbH

Udo Behrendt, Key Account Manager Aerospace, EOS GmbH

Stephan Eelman, Research and Technology Director, Germany, Boeing Research & Technology Europe

3.30 pm

Afternoon Break

4.00 pm
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section D

Track 1

Future Potentials with Additive Manufacturing of Ultra-Light and Multi-Functional Automotive Components

In order to demonstrate the potential of design possibilities combined with high rigidity, density and variation options, EDAG and LZN developed a housing for the power electronics of a future electric car, including an integrated cooling system, and manufactured this in the form of a cutaway model. Weighing just 900 g instead of the reference weight of 1,900 g, lightweight design has been implemented to an extremely high degree in the demonstrator due to the dimensioning, which meets load, topology and technical requirements. Additive manufacturing permits extremely complex, highly efficient structures, for which other processes cannot cover the cost of production or even de-moulding. In addition, parts can be designed so that they are load-specific and bionic, while ensuring minimum wall thickness and outstanding material properties, all of which offers enormous potential for lightweight construction with enhanced function integration. It is now the declared intention of EDAG and its technology partners to take this engineering methods and manufacturing processes into serial production for small quantities, for instance of electric vehicles and high performance variants.
Moderator:

Eric Klemp, Business Director, Direct Manufacturing Research Center (DMRC)

Speaker:

Dr.-Ing. Martin Hillebrecht, Head of CC Lightweight Design, Materials & Technologies, EDAG Engineering AG

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section C

Track 2

Material Properties of Nickel Superalloys (In 718) with Quasi Single-Crystalline Structure Produced by Selective Laser Melting

Nickel superalloys like Inconel 718 are predominantly used in high temperature applications e.g. in aerospace, aircraft and energy. Now, with Selective Laser Melting it is possible to design the microstructure of this and other alloys in such a way, that material properties are achieved which show a very strong anisotropy. This microstructure – here called quasi single crystalline microstructure – is produced by way of special SLM process parameters which result in a directed crystallisation. With this mechanical properties can be achieved which out beat those of conventional forged IN 718.
Moderator:

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Franz-Josef Villmer, Professor of Product Development, Innovation Management and Rapid Technologies , Ostwestfalen-Lippe University of Applied Sciences

Speaker:

Dr. Dieter Schwarze, Head Additive Processes, SLM Solutions GmbH

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Room 1

Track 3

Standardization of Additive Manufacturing – Worldwide Activities, Opportunities and Challenges

Additive Manufacturing or 3D Printing, as it is called in public media and even beyond, is a relatively new manufacturing technology and currently in an enormous hype. Amongst others mainly the new design possibilities and the overall handling make the technology interesting for various industrial sectors. Naturally, calls for standards and norms quickly arise, and a large number of organizations and associations are launching initiatives on this topic. The current paper provides an overview of currently ongoing activities and already published standards, ranging from ISO and ASTM to national organizations and shows where they focus today and will probably do in the future.
Moderator:

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Hans-Joachim Schmid , Particle Technology Group, Universitaet Paderborn

Speaker:

Jörg Lenz, Collaborative Projects Coordinator, EOS GmbH

4.30 pm
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section D

Track 1

Increasing the Productivity of Metal AM Parts - Lessons Learned by Using Multi-Laser Systems and Systems with Higher Laser Power

One of the main issues faced when producing metal parts by additive manufacturing is high costs of these parts. Since the price for a part mainly depends on the volume produced, increasing productivity is one way to reduce costs. Using systems with more than one laser is one way to increase productivity. Another way is using systems with higher laser power. This speech describes the current state of the art, possibilities to increase productivity, and challenges faced by a service company.
Moderator:

Eric Klemp, Business Director, Direct Manufacturing Research Center (DMRC)

Speaker:

Andreas Berkau, Managing Director , citim

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section C

Process-Microstructure-Property Relationships in Additively Manufactured Metallic Alloys

Additive manufacturing allows for production of highly complex components. Adding material layer by layer according to data from a design file bulk material, functionally graded structures as well as light-weight lattice structures can be manufactured from many different materials. The current paper focuses on additive manufacturing of metal powders. Selective laser melting is the method of choice. Based on exemplary studies employing a variety of materials ranging from highly ductile stainless steel, i.e. 316L, to high-strength titanium alloy, i.e. Ti-6Al-4V, the advantages and drawbacks of selective laser melting for production of near-net shape components are introduced and discussed on a materials science basis. The paper emphasizes the role of the unique processing conditions during selective laser melting on the resulting properties of components and sheds light on the possibility of enhancing materials performance just by choosing appropriate processing conditions.
Moderator:

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Franz-Josef Villmer, Professor of Product Development, Innovation Management and Rapid Technologies , Ostwestfalen-Lippe University of Applied Sciences

Speaker:

Dr.-Ing. Thomas Niendorf, Group Leader of the high-performance materials research group, Institute of Materials Engineering at TU Bergakademie Freiberg

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Room 1

Track 3

Sustainable Part Selection for the Use of Additive Manufacturing in Companies Focussing on Prevention of Product Piracy

The number of product imitations and thus infringements of intellectual properties are continuously increasing year by year. Due to new manufacturing capabilities that have not been possible in traditional manufacturing, AM can help preventing product piracy by complicating the reverse engineering process as the most important data source for imitators. Therefore the use of AM will at least reduce the economic efficiency of plagiarism for parts feasible for a layer wise production. One of the essential points for using the technology for this specific application is an appropriate selection of feasible part candidates. A systematic selection of parts is crucial for the sustainable and successful use and integration of additive manufacturing into existing businesses. It needs to be based on technical, economical and strategic aspects. A number of measures as well as a methodology will be presented to help end users to find appropriate part candidates and to protect them against product piracy.
Moderator:

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Hans-Joachim Schmid , Particle Technology Group, Universitaet Paderborn

Speaker:

Ulrich Jahnke, Research Assistant, University of Paderborn – DMRC

Christian-Friedrich Lindemann, Research Assistant, Paderborn University – DMRC

5.00 pm

Session Change

5.05 pm
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section D

Track 1

Additive Manufacturing for Launcher & Satellite Structures and Space Propulsion Components- from Rapid Prototyping to Serial Production - Challenges & Hurdles

At the time being 3D printing is thrust in the production chains of almost every industrial branch. This is owed to numerous advantages of this technology, such as low material consumption, high design flexibility, short lead times and the opportunity to synthesize advanced material properties using the effect of rapid cooling during processing. Despite these clearly proven advantages it is mandatory to have a critical view onto the industrialization of space parts in terms of the process chain like raw material procurement (powders, etc.), material properties, process re-reducibility and stability, in-process control, surface finishing processes and NDI methods producing high quality space parts. Airbus Defence & Space is working on additive manufacturing methods, comprising laser beam and electron beam powder bed process for the application in the production chain of space propulsion, satellite structures and fluid control equipment. The presentation will give an overview of challenges and hurdles from rapid prototyping to serial production.
Moderator:

Eric Klemp, Business Director, Direct Manufacturing Research Center (DMRC)

Speaker:

Dr.-Ing. Steffen Beyer, Head of Materials & Process Technology, Airbus Defense & Space

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section C

Track 2

Metal Powders – How the Production Process Influences Important Powder Properties

Metal powder is an important raw material for the selective melting- and some direct melting additive manufacturing processes. For the stability of the building process and quality of the builded parts the applied metal powders need to fulfill some important properties. These powder properties are linkedto the particle morphology, particle size distribution and powder purity. These factors are affected by the chosen powder production process. Therefore the talk gives an overview about typical methods of producing metal powders and their influence on important powder properties. When the talk comes to speak about the atomization processes in detail the influence of atomizing parameters in combination with the regarded alloy system will be worked out by means of interesting examples. It will be shown that these “internal factors” can also greatly affect the powder properties.
Moderator:

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Franz-Josef Villmer, Professor of Product Development, Innovation Management and Rapid Technologies , Ostwestfalen-Lippe University of Applied Sciences

Speaker:

Dr.-Ing. A. Pelz, Founder, m4p – metals4printing

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Room 1

Track 3

Production in Laser Sintering Manufacturing

Many speak of the 3D printing revolution, but few understand what these new technologies are really able to deliver today. The prototypes market is well covered, but few have taken the step to manufacturing. The requirements to manufacture real components are set at a much higher level. Today's modern automated production facilities require components with high precision and repeatability. These rules must be transferred to additive manufacturing
Moderator:

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Hans-Joachim Schmid , Particle Technology Group, Universitaet Paderborn

Speaker:

Hans-Ulrich Büse, Founder, Blue Production GmbH & Co. KG

5.35 pm
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section D

Track 1

3D Printing in Space at the International Space Station

In order to introduce manned stations on the moon and mars, a sustainable, manned space travel programme needs the production of the necessary infrastructure while using extra-terrestrial resources. Instead of extremely costly material transports for the setup and use of the necessary infrastructure (protection structures, tools, fuels, etc.), systems are produced using for example moon material (regolith). Additive manufacturing is a highly promising technology for extra-terrestrial manufacturing, also under extreme conditions, such as reduced gravity, extreme temperatures and low pressures. This presentation reports on the first 3D manufacturing machines on the ISS that have been developed and produced by the company “Made in Space”, Moffett Field, California, USA with support of NASA. The qualified 3D printer developed for space conditions has been carried on board the commercial space shuttle “Dragon” by the company Space X to the ISS. Economic perspectives and technological developments in accordance with these extreme conditions in extra-terrestrial worlds need innovative solutions and bring up the highest quality standards. As a side effect, the development of 3D manufacturing for extra-terrestrial applications, promises a large benefit for terrestrial applications.
Moderator:

Eric Klemp, Business Director, Direct Manufacturing Research Center (DMRC)

Speaker:

Jürgen K. von der Lippe, CEO, vdlconsult

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section C

Track 2

Advantages of Additive Manufacturing Technologies in Industrialized Tool Shops - Consultancy, Rapid Tools & High Speed Processes

This presentation addresses competition advantages of industrialized tool shops using additive manufacturing technologies in the areas of
  • marketing and article development support
  • laboratory testing of functional prototypes in the early stages of product development processes
  • advanced performance of moulds partially build by additive manufacturing technologies
  • the future potential of single parts and micro series produced by additive manufacturing technologies
  • Rapid- and high-speed tooling using polymer cavities
Technologies are presented and evaluated in consideration of their individual characteristics and fields of application.
Moderator:

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Franz-Josef Villmer, Professor of Product Development, Innovation Management and Rapid Technologies , Ostwestfalen-Lippe University of Applied Sciences

Speaker:

Ralf Gärtner, Director Tool Shop Plastics, Phoenix Contact GmbH & Co. KG

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Room 1

Track 3

Additive Manufacturing Technologies for Regenerative Medicine Applications

A key factor in scaffold-based tissue and organ regeneration relies on enhancing (stem) cell-material interactions to obtain the same original functionality. Different approaches include delivery of biological factors and surface topography modifications. Although both strategies have proved to augment cell activity on biomaterials, they are still characterized by limited control in space and time, which hampers the proper regeneration of complex tissues. Here, we present a few examples where integration of additive manufacturing platforms allowed the generation of a new library of scaffolds with tailored biological, physical, and chemical cues at the macro, micro, and nano scale. These porous biomaterials influence the activity of cells, thereby sustaining the regeneration of targeted tissues. From these examples as well as from the study of other scientists, converging additive menufacturing technologies seems to be a powerful route towards designing of 3D scaffolds with instructive properties able to control cell activity for the regeneration of functional tissues. Future efforts should aim at further improving technology integration to achieve a fine control at the cell-material interface by designing scaffolds at multiple scales. This will enable the regeneration of complex tissues including vasculature and innervation, which will result in enhanced in vivo integration with surrounding tissues. By doing so, the gap from tissue to organ regeneration will be reduced, bringing regenerative medicine technologies closer to the clinics.
Moderator:

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Hans-Joachim Schmid , Particle Technology Group, Universitaet Paderborn

Speaker:

Dr. Lorenzo Moroni, Associate Professor, Department of Complex Tissue Regeneration Maastricht University The Netherlands

6.00 pm

Networking Reception


Day 2 - Wednesday - 4 March, 2015

Session descriptions day 2

8.30 am

Registration + Welcome Coffee

9.00 am
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section D

Morning Keynote with Prof. Franz Josef Villmer

Additive Manufacturing: From Hype to Reality

Additive Manufacturing has been described as a disruptive innovation and a significant part of the next industrial revolution. Media attention is currently tremendous. We have to ask ourselves: is it just a current hype around 3D Printing? A distinction has to be made between professional additive manufacturing which is mostly on the enterprise level and consumer 3D printing. Professional additive manufacturing is a more or less established manufacturing technology with its own advantages and shortcomings. It enables revolutionary manufacturing performances like new levels of object complexity and lot size independent production cost. To utilize all opportunities of professional AM, it should only be applied for the production of such parts which make extended use of the AM capabilities instead of mimicking conventional manufacturing technologies. Consumer 3D printing on the other hand creates a new digital movement and will probably democratize the idea to product processes. But the quality of printed parts and the general applicability are sometimes disappointing. Will this dampen spirit and enthusiasm of the movement?
Moderator:

Eric Klemp, Business Director, Direct Manufacturing Research Center (DMRC)

Speaker:

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Franz-Josef Villmer, Professor of Product Development, Innovation Management and Rapid Technologies , Ostwestfalen-Lippe University of Applied Sciences

9.30 am
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section D

Featured Session

How 3D Printing Has Already Changed Toy Design, is Currently Reinventing Everything, and the Amazing Future Ahead

Hear how 3D printing has already changed the toy industry, how it is currently changing, and the amazing future ahead. See how the corporate overseas manufacturing model vs. the “American Made (in my garage)” culture is evolving through fun toy examples. Find out how 3D prototyping has changed and accelerated Mark’s private inventing business on every level. He will also discuss why there has never been a more exciting time to be an inventor/designer/artist – and how anyone can get involved in changing the world today. 3D printing allows inventors to maximize their talents to create anything they can dream up, and make a living doing it. Plus insights into our awesome future…. and how it is being reimagined everyday.
Moderator:

Eric Klemp, Business Director, Direct Manufacturing Research Center (DMRC)

Speaker:

Mark Trageser, President and Founder, Kram-Co. Inc.

10.00 am

Morning Coffee Break

10.30 am
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section D

Track 1

Current State and New Developments of Quality Monitoring in the Laser Melting Process

LaserCusing® offers new possibilities creating metal parts with a high geometry freedom. This dynamic additive manufacturing process has a diversified number of influencing values. To document and guarantee high process quality, e.g. for aerospace and medical industries, the process can be monitored using different technical approaches. The presentation will provide an overview of such systems, e.g. laser power meter, oxygen analysis, coating control or meltpool monitoring, which help to detect process anomalies and ensure consistent process conditions. With new developments, like 3D visualization of monitoring signals, the customer can get a detailed analysis of the laser melting process.
Moderator:

Eric Klemp, Business Director, Direct Manufacturing Research Center (DMRC)

Speaker:

Marie Ebert, Development Engineer, Concept Laser GmbH

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section C

Track 2

On Tolerances for Additive Manufacturing: Pre-study and Motivation for the Tolerance Development

Although additive manufacturing provides great design freedoms and benefits, its industrial relevance is still limited. One reason for this is that parts need to meet high quality requirements for end-use part production purposes. Parts have to fulfil all their requirements and functions. Consequently, geometrical part shapes have to meet these requirements too. Usually, such geometrical requirements are set and defined by geometrical tolerances. However, for additive manufacturing processes, it is, up to now, hardly known how large such tolerances can and have to be. Reliable, profound and comprehensive information about tolerances for additive manufacturing are neither known in literature nor in standards. Thus, in order to develop tolerances, a pre-study has been performed. This indicates relevant geometrical, process and material factors that influence the dimensional accuracy of additively manufactured parts. As well the pre-study allows a first comparison of additive manufacturing to established manufacturing in terms of tolerances. The presentation points out the substantial findings of the pre-study and deduces aims for a research project that was set up in order to develop tolerances for additive manufacturing.
Moderator:

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Hans-Joachim Schmid , Particle Technology Group, Universitaet Paderborn

Speaker:

Guido Adam, Research Engineer, DMRC - Direct Manufacturing Research Center

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Room 1

Track 3

Additive Manufacturing of High-Performance Ceramics

In the field of ceramic processing there is a strong need for the introduction of additive manufacturing techniques. Tools for powder injection molding (PIM) are very expensive and require significant lead times which severely restrict the suitability of PIM for the production of small scale series or customized products; however, no adequate prototyping technology exists so far. The main reason for that are the high demands on high-performance ceramics – these materials are used where other materials fail, thus the quality and the reliability of the parts are crucial.
Moderator:

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Franz-Josef Villmer, Professor of Product Development, Innovation Management and Rapid Technologies , Ostwestfalen-Lippe University of Applied Sciences

Speaker:

Dr. Johannes Homa, Co-founder and CEO, Lithoz GmbH

11.00 am
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section D

Track 1

3D Screen-Printing Going to Mass Production of Metal Parts

Screen-printing is an industrially established high-throughput technology. In 3D screen-printing, the printing paste contains solid metal particles and the printing cycle is repeated many times until parts have reached their designated height. A heat treatment follows which eventually leads to near fully dense metal parts. Provided the speed of a modern screen printing machine, it is possible to print millions of high-precision parts per year with just a single machine. The current state-of-the-art is reported based on ongoing projects at IFAM Dresden covering stainless steel, copper as well as refractory metal part development for different industrial applications.
Moderator:

Eric Klemp, Business Director, Direct Manufacturing Research Center (DMRC)

Speaker:

Dr. Olaf Andersen, Head of Department of Cellular Metallic Materials, Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing and Advanced Materials

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section C

Track 2

AM for Repair and Maintenance of Aircrafts – Lessons Learned of the EU Project RepAIR

The EU funded project RepAIR (www.rep-air.eu) envisages enhancing the repair and maintenance of aircraft parts by the use of additive manufacturing. AM technologies are used and adapted to allow "high batch" repair of parts using Selective Laser Melting or an Direct Metal Deposition to repair complex individual parts; these technologies need to be integrated into repair and maintenance processes by means of organisational changes and the integration of software components. The presentation will show mid-term results and draw early conclusions regarding the RepAIR concept and its future application in aircraft MRO.
Moderator:

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Hans-Joachim Schmid , Particle Technology Group, Universitaet Paderborn

Speaker:

Dr.-Ing. Jens Pottebaum, Senior Researcher, Universitaet Paderborn, C.I.K.

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Room 1

Track 3

Colour 3D Printing: What is it and why does it Matter?

Why 3D print in colour? After all, we haven’t used colour 3D printing in a widespread manner before. Colour is one way to make your products stand out over the competition and allows you to communicate better. Consumers want to be able to print customised gifts and keepsakes in full colour. Many 3D printers are now providing colour 3D printing capabilities. But the definition of what it means to print in ‘colour’ varies among 3D printers. What is the difference? Which is best suited for your application needs? What new business possibilities are available with colour 3D printing?
Moderator:

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Franz-Josef Villmer, Professor of Product Development, Innovation Management and Rapid Technologies , Ostwestfalen-Lippe University of Applied Sciences

Speaker:

Dr. Conor MacCormack, Co-founder & CEO, Mcor Technologies Ltd

11.30 am

Session Change

11.35 am
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section D

Track 1

How to Select the Right Application for 3D Printing in Your Business

3D printing is everywhere, but how to get started in your company? How do you select the right parts to start with in your 3D Printing journey? This presentation will give insight in the economics of 3D printing of plastic components and will provide tools to select the right parts in your business.
Moderator:

Eric Klemp, Business Director, Direct Manufacturing Research Center (DMRC)

Speaker:

Jurgen Laudus, Director, Additive Manufacturing Services Business Unit , Materialise

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section C

Track 2:

Multi-Material Compounds (MMC) Processed by the Selective-Laser-Melting Technique

Materials processed by Selective Laser Melting (SLM) are often alloys which have been widely used in conventional manufacturing processes before. Due to new possibilities arising from the SLM process, near-net-shape manufacturing of multi-material compounds seems feasible. Thus, the aim of this case-study is to proof the workability of a ceramic reinforced aluminium-alloy, processed by the SLM-technique. In a first step, different ceramics have been mixed with aluminium-alloy AlSi7Mg in order to analyse the process-behaviour when different materials are simultaneous processed. Afterwards, the mixing ratio of a chosen compound has been varied and optimized. The results obtained will be discussed in light of the evolution of the microstructure and the mechanical properties under monotonic loading. In addition, further trends in the field of innovative SLM materials will be shown.
Moderator:

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Hans-Joachim Schmid , Particle Technology Group, Universitaet Paderborn

Speaker:

Peter Koppa, Research Assistant, Direct Manufacturing Research Center (DMRC)

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Room 1

Track 3

Present and Future of Materials for Selective Laser Sintering

Materials successfully processable with Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) are very few today. The presentation picks up this topic and gives a short introduction on the material and powder properties necessary for successful SLS-processing. As a main part the contribution provides a short summary of the materials available currently, their origin and what performance could be expected. Also the still remaining limitations will be pointed out. Finally, some recent material developments will be highlighted and also perception to actually on-going material development projects is given. Target markets for successful implementation of SLS-technology are connected with the different parts of the presentation.
Moderator:

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Franz-Josef Villmer, Professor of Product Development, Innovation Management and Rapid Technologies , Ostwestfalen-Lippe University of Applied Sciences

Speaker:

Dr. Manfred Schmid, Head of the R&D-group for Selective Laser Sintering (SLS), Inspire AG

12.05 pm
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section D

Track 1

Additive Manufacturing and Rapid Tooling - Dream and Reality

Within the last 2 decades the limitations of additive manufacturing have been changed significantly in respect of material properties, precision, reliability, cost effectiveness and volumes. Nevertheless reality does not fit to the idea, that many press reports are giving. We look behind the scenes from a hand on perspective and show unusual examples. Finally the question is asked, what do we need, to let the regularly reported future vision come through.
Moderator:

Eric Klemp, Business Director, Direct Manufacturing Research Center (DMRC)

Speaker:

Thomas Lück, cirp GmbH

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section C

Track 2

Current Trends and Challenges in Industrial Polymer AM

Polymer Additive Manufacturing (AM) Technologies show many advantages regarding the production of prototypes, small series or complex part geometries. The tool-free direct manufacturing offers a high production flexibility. However, there are also some challenges, for example limited process understanding. To build high-quality end use parts, the whole production process and its influencing factors have to be known well. This presentation discusses important results from different research projects regarding the Laser Sintering (LS) and Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) technology. For both technologies, the surface properties are discussed dependent on significant process parameters. A simulation of the surface topography as well as the post-treatment of parts offer possibilities to improve the surface quality and dimensional accuracy. Another focus is on advanced mechanical properties of FDM built ABS-M30 and LS built PA12 parts. In addition, the cooling process regarding LS and its importance for the achievement of reproducible part properties is analyzed.
Moderator:

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Hans-Joachim Schmid , Particle Technology Group, Universitaet Paderborn

Speaker:

Stefan Josupeit, Scientific Staff Member, DMRC

Matthias Fischer, Research Assistant, Paderborn University – DMRC

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Room 1

Track 3

Materials in Laser Sintering: Availability, Characteristics and New Developments

For the laser sintering process only few materials are available. Therefore, it is often asked for new materials. However, even the available materials offer very different part property profiles even when using the same polymer type. Within the talk, part property profiles and processing conditions of different commercial laser sintering materials are compared. Differences in mechanical part properties and surface roughness of parts are shown. Based on these properties, a benchmark should be done in order to judge the applicability of the materials for specific requirements. In a second focus within the talk, new material developments and their specific property profiles should be introduced in order to give a perspective on the future development of the material market in laser sintering.
Moderator:

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Franz-Josef Villmer, Professor of Product Development, Innovation Management and Rapid Technologies , Ostwestfalen-Lippe University of Applied Sciences

Speaker:

Andreas Wegner, Lehrstuhl für Fertigungstechnik, Universität Duisburg-Essen

12.25 pm

Lunch

1.25 pm
Sessions are held in German.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section D

Panel Discussion

3D-Druck-Revolution aus politischer Perspektive: Chancen und Herausforderungen für Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft

Was kommt auf die Industrie zu in Chancen und Risiken? Wird 3D-Druck die Welt smarter machen?

o Auswirkungen auf Wertschöpfungsstrukturen durch veränderte Produktions- und Logistikprozesse: 3D-Druck/Additives Fertigen als Universalwerkzeug für individualisierte Massenproduktion? Wird es zum Beispiel weniger Transport, weniger Emissionen oder schnellere Lieferungen von Waren und Ersatzteilen geben?
o Auswirkungen auf Produkte selbst durch Eigenproduktion beim Kunden/Kopiermöglichkeiten?

In welchem Maße berücksichtigt die Politik bereits heute die Transformation, die mit 3D-Druck einhergeht? Bereiten sich Ministerien und Behörden sich darauf vor, hier zu regulieren?

Gibt es dabei irgend etwas, was man von bereits digital disruptierten Branchen wie der Musikindustrie lernen kann, die ja einige Erfahrungen machen mußte (notwendige Veränderungen von Geschäftsmodellen)?

Werden Produktionsprozesse nur etwas intelligenter und flexibler (Smart Industry/ Industrie 4.0) oder wird sich unser Verständnis zur Rolle von Fabriken hierdurch komplett wandeln? Müssen wir mit weniger Großfabriken rechnen, die ihre Produktion in die Nähe des Kunden/Verkaufsortes (Point of Sale), z.B. zurück in die Städte verlagern? Wird 3D-Druck vielleicht sogar Produktionskapazitäten aus Niedriglohnländern zurück nach Europa bringen?

Muss sich das klassisch verarbeitende Gewerbe auf Probleme im Bereich Urheberechtsverletzungen (digitale Piraterie physischer Güter) einstellen, so wie bereits Branchen wie bspw. die Musikindustrie? Ist das Spotify-Prinzip des Flatrate-Konsums eine mögliche Lösung beim Handel mit physischen Gütern?

Wie ist mit verringerter Kontrolle von Produktions-/Geschäftsgeheimnissen umzugehen?

Wie ist mit bestehenden Standards für technische Qualität (Normung) umzugehen, wie kann man das kontrollieren?

Moderator:

Cornelius Wendel, Public Affairs advisor and founder, POLICYNAVIGATION

Speaker:

Lars Klingbeil MdB, Mitglied des SPD-Fraktionsvorstands

Dr. Florian Drücke, Geschäftsführer, Bundesverband Musikindustrie e.V.

Ulli Klenk, General Manager, Siemens AG

2.05 pm
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section D

Afternoon Keynote

3D Printing: Examining the Myths

Additive manufacturing comprises a range of incredible technologies that have revolutionized the way we design and bring new products to market, and have become an entirely new catalyst for innovation. Over the last 5 years, it has become a hot-topic that has received an inordinate amount of media coverage and hype. This presentation examines some of this hype and attempts to redress some of the myths that have grown from it in a positive way by looking at application examples that demonstrate the true advantages that additive manufacturing offer if used in the most appropriate way.
Speaker:

Prof. Dr. Olaf Diegel, Lund University

2.35 pm

Session Change

2.40 pm
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section D

Track 1

Additive Manufacturing – Added Design Value

Mass production made high quality goods generally affordable though standardisation and uniformity. The flexibility of digital design and manufacturing technologies allows us now to the reassess relationships between consumer, manufacture and designer. 3D printing can offer bespoke solutions, industrially manufactured or simply printed at home. Products can be tailored to an individual’s need or desire whilst till benefiting from mass-market economies of scale. Like-for-like additive layer-build technologies cannot match the cost and performance of convention high volume manufacturing. But it is the added value that digital manufacturing can bring that justifies these premium processes.
Moderator:

Eric Klemp, Business Director, Direct Manufacturing Research Center (DMRC)

Speaker:

Lionel T Dean, Founder and Creative Director, FutureFactories

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section C

Track 2

Bionics and 3D Printing – a Perfect Match

Nature shows astonishing examples of functional integration and light weight design. The principles of “nature like design” have been known for a long time. However, their use in solving technical problems was rare due to the limitations of manufacturing technologies. The freedom of design coming along with 3D printing technologies overcomes these limitations.
The presentation features principle natural design rules and examples of technical solutions that are now possible to manufacture. The approach is used in different ways:
  1. creating functionally integrating products
  2. creating functional modules
  3. designing mechanical answers of selected areas – in other words creating mechanical properties. The ideas are presented along real life cases for sports equipment and automation products.
Moderator:

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Franz-Josef Villmer, Professor of Product Development, Innovation Management and Rapid Technologies , Ostwestfalen-Lippe University of Applied Sciences

Speaker:

Volker Junior, CEO, phoenix GmbH & Co. KG

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Room 1

Track 3

Management of Complexity in Supply Chains

The presentation focuses on presenting a generic framework for using additive manufacturing (AM) as an appropriate production method to address the management of complexity in supply chains. It will show what impact AM will have on supply chains. As several drivers such as changing customer demand patterns and intensifying global competition increase product complexity, the available number of product variants and related processes within the supply chain itself increase costs and dilute scale effects, this presentation shows a developed framework and methodlogy – including state-of-the-art examples – which helps to manage in supply chains through additive manufacturing.
Moderator:

Christian-Friedrich Lindemann, Research Assistant, Paderborn University – DMRC

Speaker:

Dr. André Kieviet, Leuphana Universität

3.10 pm
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section D

Track 1

3D Printing: New Opportunities for the Creative Industries

Generative processes are a golden opportunity for the creative industries to implement new ideas in a fast and cost-effective way. Designers and architects can, for example, offer their drafts as models and products and therefore rapidly present their customers with tailored solutions. The large number of existing technologies in the market, the decision re suitable materials and the required preparation of the 3D data represent further hurdles for the use of 3D printing. The University of Applied Science Offenburg is developing, in cooperation with the MFG Foundation Baden-Württemberg within the Karl-Steinbruch Research Programme, new methods and tools in order to facilitate suitable processes and materials, as well as data processing. 3D printing technologies will, therefore, be a practical proposition for the creative industries, with a positive economic benefit.
Moderator:

Eric Klemp, Business Director, Direct Manufacturing Research Center (DMRC)

Speaker:

B.Sc. Daniel Böhnke, Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter, Labor "Rapid Prototyping", Hochschule Offenburg

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section C

Track 2

Additive Design and Manufacturing

Additive manufacturing is a new method to produce components. Many companies are looking for implementing AM into their production. This presentation gives some basic information about how to use AM for industrial component manufacturing. The presentation includes information about technical work flows and commercial calculations as well as a method to implement additive design and manufacturing in companies by outsourced contract manufacturing. The presentation is targeted at CEOs, COOs and CFOs who are looking for an efficient way to use AM in their manufacturing business.
Moderator:

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Franz-Josef Villmer, Professor of Product Development, Innovation Management and Rapid Technologies , Ostwestfalen-Lippe University of Applied Sciences

Speaker:

Alexander Oster, netfabb GmbH

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Room 1

Track 3

Generic Design and Interactive Configuration

One of the biggest economic benefits of 3d printing is the ability to manufacture small lot numbers from a few dozen down to a single object. For getting the maximum benefit for the customer from that, a software system is needed that allows to create 3d model templates that can be modified and finalised into different shapes by each customer individually. This implies the system's capability for "generic construction". The potentials and perspectives of such an "open" design and CAD approach is discussed and illustrated based on the software system "s-pree" from trinckle 3D.
Moderator:

Christian-Friedrich Lindemann, Research Assistant, Paderborn University – DMRC

Speaker:

Dr. Gunnar Schulze, Founder and CTO, trinckle 3D GmbH

3.40 pm

Kaffeepause

4.00 pm
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section D

Track 1

How Much Open Source is Good for 3D Printing?

More and more people are integrating 3D printing into their daily work, and their demand is to have reliable, intelligent and easy-to-use systems that let employees operate these machines right away. Furthermore, they need systems around their machines, including service and maintenance. Can this be achieved in a completely open environment?
Moderator:

Eric Klemp, Business Director, Direct Manufacturing Research Center (DMRC)

Speaker:

Alexander Hafner, General Manager, MakerBot Europe GmbH

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section C

Track 2

PolyNODE – Generative Design of 3D Printed Parts in Large Spatial Assemblies

PolyNODE is a prototype of for an interior design system comprised of CNC-cut wooden panels and 3D printed connectors. The connectors are design generatively as the form is developed. Connectors and panels are fabricated separately and assembled later without the need for additional fasteners or adhesives. By defining the genotype for node and panel and embedding them into a parametric design environment each design candidate includes valid fabrication data.PolyNODE addresses the problem of scalability in the context of interior design without the necessity for large 3D printing systems. It couples two digital fabrication processes into a seamless environment.
Moderator:

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Franz-Josef Villmer, Professor of Product Development, Innovation Management and Rapid Technologies , Ostwestfalen-Lippe University of Applied Sciences

Speaker:

Mirco Becker, Founder/ Guest Professor, informance / Städelschule Architecture Class

Sessions are held in English.
4.30 pm
Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall 1 - Section D

Track 1

3D Hubs: Everyone can Have Access to Local Production

3D Hubs is world’s largest and fastest growing network of 3D printers. By making 3D printing locally accessible to everyone 3D Hubs is changing the way products are being manufactured and distributed. Today the network is providing over one Billion people with access to a 3D printer within 10 miles of their home. With the largest material choice in the industry and an average delivery time of less than two days 3D Hubs has become the preferred 3D printing platform for both design professionals and consumers that want customized products.
Moderator:

Christian-Friedrich Lindemann, Research Assistant, Paderborn University – DMRC

Speaker:

Simona Ferrari, EU Community Manager, 3D Hubs

Sessions are held in English.
Room: Convention Hall I – Section C

Track 2

Potentials of 3D Printing in Educational Learning Contexts

Innovations result from the curiosity of discovering and inventing. Therefore it is not surprising that 3D printing also offers diverse possibilities of knowledge transfer, of experiencing process chains and developing expertise and key skills in educational learning contexts. Here 3D printing should be considered as a cross-competence, because only this can gauge its potential in schools. 3D printing enables learning processes of students from the first idea to the final product. Furthermore it promotes group project competencies and skills such as spatial imagination and creativity as well as problem solving and cooperation skills.In addition to educational theory and application, we will show best practice examples of 3D-printing in educational learning projects based on a constructivist approach of situated and collaborative learning.
Moderator:

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Franz-Josef Villmer, Professor of Product Development, Innovation Management and Rapid Technologies , Ostwestfalen-Lippe University of Applied Sciences

Speaker:

Dean Ciric, Chief Executive Officer, fabmaker

Gardenia Alonso, Professor for International Business Communication, AKAD University

Sessions are held in English.
5.00 pm

End of Inside 3D Printing